东农18秋《大学英语III》离线作业题目

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东北农业大学网络教育学院
大学英语第三册网上作业题
一、单项选择题
1. He is watching TV? He is _____ to be cleaning his room.
A) known B) supposed C) regarded D) considered
2. The Smiths decided to _____ a boy and a girl though they already had three children.
A) adapt B) bring C) receive D) adopt
3. The newspaper didn’t mention the ___ of the damage caused by the fire.
A) range B) level C) extent D) quantity
4. We can not trust him any more because he often ________ his duty.
 A) owes B) spoils C) deserts D) neglects
5. In order to increase our output, we need to import more production _______.
 A) facilities B) hens C) votes D) artists
6. Free medical service is _______ to nearly all the college students in China.
 A) favorite B) available C) convenient D) average
7. Iron supplements may produce a feeling of wanting to ____ , and may be poisonous in some cases.
A) throw away B) throw up C) throw in D) throw out
8. Grant Wood instantly ____ to fame in 1930 with his painting American Gothic, an often-copied interpretation of the solemn pride of American farmers.
A) arise B) rise C) rose D) raised
9. James Montgomery is famous for his army ____ posters of World Wars I and II.
A) recruited B) recruiting C) recruit D) recrutation
10. If you had been ____ in your study, you would have passed the examination without any difficulty.
A) big-minded B) single-minded C) broad-minded D)narrow-minded
11. My English professor told me to____ my vocabulary, to ____ my sentence length and to ____ my tone.
A) amplify; justify; enlarge B)enlarge; justify; diversify
C) diversify; enlarge; amplify D) enlarge; amplify; diversify
12. The Buffalo nickel was ____ in memory of the destruction of the buffalo herds and the American Indians.
A) descended B) designed C) deprived D) detailed
13. The point in ____ by correspondence is not whether we should do it but whether we can do it.
A) argument B) debate C) dispute D) controversy
14. ____ their difference, the couple were developing an obvious and genuine affection for each other.
A) But for B) For all C) Above all D) Except for
15. The early pioneers had to ____ many hardships to settle on the new land.
A) go into B) go through C) go back on D) go about
16. We should keep a ____ eye on the prisoners every moment.
A) jealous B) envious C) jealousy D) envy
17. I would appreciate ____ it a secret.
A) your keeping B) you to keep
C) that you keep D) that you will keep
18. Over the last fifteen years, running has become a popular ____ for 30 million participants of the ages.
A) fantasy B) pastime C) symposium D) penalty
19. Now the cheers and applause ____ in a single sustained roar.
A) mingled B) concentrated C) assembled D) permeated
20. I couldn’t find ____ , and so I took this one.
A) a large enough coat B) an enough large coat
C) a large coat enough D) a coat enough large
21. ____ quite recently, most mothers in Britain did not take paid work outside the home.
A) Before B) Until C) From D) Since
22. Tryon was extremely angry, but cool-headed enough to ____ storming into the boss’s office.
A) prevent B) prohibit C) turn D) avoid
23. They are sure they have all the facts they need to ____ the existence of a black hole.
A) obtain B) maintain C) verify D) display
24. The town planning commission said that their financial outlook for the next year was optimistic. They expect increased tax ____.
A) efficiency B) revenues C) privileges D) validity
25. It is not ---_______ for me to return all the books to the library now because I still need some of them for my research.
 A) continuous B) difficult C) convenient D) sufficient
26. He is the only person who can ____ in this case, because the other witnesses were killed mysteriously.
A) testify B) charge C) accuse D) rectify
27. This boy was _______ for what he had done in the class.
 A) scolded B) overcome C) inclined D) displayed
28. On weekend my grandpa usually ____ a glass of wine.
A) subscribes B) engages in C) hangs on D) indulges in
29. The leader of the expedition ____ everyone to follow his example.
A) promoted B) reinforced C)sparked D) inspired
30. We must look beyond ____ and assumptions and try to discover what is missing.
A) justifications B) illusions C) manifestations D) specifications
31. The government is trying to do something to ____ better understanding between the two nations .
A) raise B) promote C) heighten D) increase
32. The soldier was _____ of running away when the enemy attacked.
A) scolded B) charged C) accused D) punished
33. People appreciate ____ with him because he has a good sense of humor.
A) to work B) to have worked C) working D) having worked
34. When a spacecraft travels, one of the major problems is reentry into the Earth’s _______.
 A) surface B) atmosphere C) attitude D) bent
35. We are _______ at the rapid progress Mark has made in this semester.
 A) distinguished B) annoyed C) astonished D) scored
36. He tried to _______relations with his former wife but he failed.
 A) measure B) maintain C) shelter D) reply
37. It can be said without any ____ that this factory can products 100,000 bikes every month.
A) boast B) exaggerate C) boastful D) exaggeration
38. An employee told the government official that “US” is short ____ “Uncle Sam”.
A) for B) to C) with D) on
39. The committee did not ____ of the plan to build a new bridge over the river, for it will cost too much.
A) prove B) approve C) disapprove D) disprove
40. A few villagers were ____ of “Lord Williams” but most saw nothing that aroused doubts until later.
A) suspicious B) suspicion C) doubtable D) doubted
41. Women do not usually eat the recommended daily ____ of iron.
A) section B) allowance C) share D) part
42. He wasn’t ___ to sit and watch, but he could not stand unaided on the soft sand because of his lameness.
A) conceited B) content C) concept D) concentrated
43. We ____ Edison’s success to his intelligence and hard work.
A) subject B) attribute C) owe D)refer
44. The police accused him of setting fire to the building but he denied ____ in the area on the might of the fire.
A) to be B) to have been C) having been D) be
45. She accused the man _____ breaking into her house.
A) at B) of C) for D) with
46. Many people like white color as it is a ____ of purity.
A) symbol B) sign C) signal D) symptom
47. Everyone should be ____ to a decent standard of living and an opportunity to be educated.
A) attributed B) entitled C) identified D) justified
48. You have nothing to ____ by refusing to listen to our advice.
A) gain B) grasp C)seize D) earn
49. On weekend my grandpa usually ____ a glass of wine.
A) subscribes B) engages in C) hangs on D) indulges in
50. Though ____ in a big city, Peter always prefers to paint the primitive scenes of country life.
A) grown B) raised C) tended D) cultivated
51. The manager urged his staff not to ____ the splendid opportunity.
A) drop B) miss C) escape D) slide
52. Mr. Smith was the only witness who said that the fire was ____.
A) mature B) deliberate C) meaningful D) innocent
53. This is the nurse who ____ to me when I was ill in hospital.
A) accompanied B) attended C) entertained D) shielded
54. Although he had looked through all the reference material on the subject, he still found it hard to understand this point and her explanation only ____ to his confusion.
A) extended B) amounted C) added D) turned
55. This morning in the class, our teacher lost his _______ at last because he could not stand any more.
 A) temper B) terror C) verse D) contain
56. He keeps on with physical training in winter ___________cold it is . A) whatever B) no matter how C) whether or not D) although
57. The woman was worried about the side effects of taking aspirins, but her doctor____ her that it is absolutely harmless.
A) retrieved B) released C) reassured D) revived
58. We should make a clear ____ between the two scientific terms for the purpose of our discussion.
A) separation B) discrimination C) deviation D) distinction
59. Most broadcasters maintain that TV has been unfairly criticized and argue that the power of the medium is ____.
A) granted B) implied C) exaggerated D) remedied
60. His wife is constantly finding ____ with him, which makes him very angry.
A) errors B) shortcomings C) fault D) flaw
61. We must look beyond ____ and assumptions and try to discover what is missing.
A) justifications B) illusions C) manifestations D) specifications
62. Most broadcasters maintain that TV has been unfairly criticized and argue that the power of the medium is ____.
A) granted B) implied C) exaggerated D) remedied
63. He is watching TV? He is _____ to be cleaning his room.
A) known B) supposed C) regarded D) considered
64. The Smiths decided to _____ a boy and a girl though they already had three children.
A) adapt B) bring C) receive D) adopt
65. I had just started back for the house to change my clothes ____ I heard voices.
A) as B) when C) after D) while
66. We can not trust him any more because he often ________ his duty.
 A) owes B) spoils C) deserts D) neglects
67. In order to increase our output, we need to import more production _______.
  A) facilities B) hens C) votes D) artists
68. Free medical service is _______ to nearly all the college students in China.
  A) favorite B) available C) convenient D) average
69. Iron supplements may produce a feeling of wanting to ____ , and may be poisonous in some cases.
A) throw away B) throw up C) throw in D) throw out
70. Grant Wood instantly ____ to fame in 1930 with his painting American Gothic, an often-copied interpretation of the solemn pride of American farmers.
A) arise B) rise C) rose D) raised
71. I rub cream into the old woman’s yellow skin, feeling perfectly the ____ of each bone in the back.
A) outline B) organization C) structure D) frame
72. If you had been ____ in your study, you would have passed the examination without any difficulty.
A) big-minded B) single-minded C) broad-minded D)narrow-minded
73. My English professor told me to____ my vocabulary, to ____ my sentence length and to ____ my tone.
A) amplify; justify; enlarge B)enlarge; justify; diversify
C) diversify; enlarge; amplify D) enlarge; amplify; diversify
74. Women do not usually eat the recommended daily ____ of iron.
A) section B) allowance C) share D) part
75. The point in ____ by correspondence is not whether we should do it but whether we can do it.
A) argument B) debate C) dispute D) controversy
76. ____ their difference, the couple were developing an obvious and genuine affection for each other.
A) But for B) For all C) Above all D) Except for
77. We ____ Edison’s success to his intelligence and hard work.
A) subject B) attribute C) owe D)refer
78. We should keep a ____ eye on the prisoners every moment.
A) jealous B) envious C) jealousy D) envy
79. Under the present system, state enterprises must ____ all profits to the government.
A) turn down B) turn up C) turn out D) turn in
80. Many people like white color as it is a ____ of purity.
A) symbol B) sign C) signal D) symptom
81. Now the cheers and applause ____ in a single sustained roar.
A) mingled B) concentrated C) assembled D) permeated
82. John Dewey believed that education should be a preparation for life that a person learns by doing, and that teaching must ____ the curiosity and creativity of children.
A) seek B) stimulate C) shape D) secure
83. He asked us to ____ them in carrying through their plan.
A) provide B) arouse C) assist D) persist
84. Mr. Smith was the only witness who said that the fire was ____.
A) mature B) deliberate C) meaningful D) innocent
85. Tryon was extremely angry, but cool-headed enough to ____ storming into the boss’s office.
A) prevent B) prohibit C) turn D) avoid
86. She gave him back the money she’d stolen, for ____ sake.
A) consent’s B) conscience’s C) her D) conscious
87. If you have any problems during your study here, please do not _______ to call me for help
  A) hesitate B) despair C) urge D) request
88. Some lazy men would rather _______ than work.
  A) indicate B) declare C) solve D) starve
89. He keeps on with physical training in winter ___________cold it is . A) whatever B) no matter how C) whether or not D) although
90. The designer has applied for a ____ for his new invention.
A) tariff B) discount C) version D) patent
91. The soldier was _____ of running away when the enemy attacked.
A) scolded B) charged C) accused D) punished
92. Had he worked hard, he _____ the exams.
A) must have got through B) would have got through
C) would get through D) could get through
93. The pressure _____ causes Americans to be energetic, but it also puts them under a constant emotional strains.
A) to compete B) competing C) to be competed D) having competed
94. He tried to _______relations with his former wife but he failed.
 A) measure B) maintain C) shelter D) reply
95. He _______ to study harder in the future so that he could have more opportunities to find a better job.
 A) resolved B) resorted C) requested D) reserved
96. The engineers in this lab spent several weeks _______ their plans for the new bicycle.
 A) counting B) stripping C) elaborating D) casting
97. James Montgomery is famous for his army ____ posters of World Wars I and II.
A) recruited B) recruiting C) recruit D) recrutation
98. James Fraser ____ tradition by using three actual American Indians as models for his creation.
A) went out B) went for C) went in D) went against
99. His parents did not approve of his plan to go and study abroad with a girl they had never met, but he ____ and married her.
A) went against B) went for C) went for nothing D) went ahead
100. The ____ of Liberty was dedicated on an island in Upper New York Bay in 1886.
A) Status B) Statue C) Stature D) State
101. After the war, a character called Uncle Sam began appearing in political cartoon, his from ____ from an earlier cartoon character called Brother Jonathan.
A) involving B) changing C) evolving D) altering
102. Her skin was dry after ____ to the wind during the trip.
A) failure B) disclosure C) exposure D) pressure
103. She accused the man _____ breaking into her house.
A) at B) of C) for D) with
104. When Mr. Jones gets old, he will ____ his business to his son.
A) take over B) hand over C) think over D) get over
105. My camera can be ____ to take pictures in cloudy or sunny conditions.
A) treated B) adjusted C) adopted D) remedied
106. Those acting for the defendant proposed to appeal ____ the sentence.
A) to B)against C) for D) out
107. The manager promised to keep me ____ of how our business was going on.
A) to be informed B) on informing C) informed D) informing
108. Our hopes ___ and fell in the same instant.
A) aroused B) arose C) raised D) rose
109. I’m very sorry to have ____ you with so many questions on such an occasion.
A) interfered B) offended C) impressed D) bothered
110. Though ____ in a big city, Peter always prefers to paint the primitive scenes of country life.
A) grown B) raised C) tended D) cultivated
111. In the Chinese household, grandparents and other relative play ___ roles in raising children.
A) incapable B) indispensable C) insensible D) infinite
112. Although he had looked through all the reference material on the subject, he still found it hard to understand this point and her explanation only ____ to his confusion.
A) extended B) amounted C) added D) turned
113. He was such a ____ speaker that he held our attention every minute of the three-hour lecture.
A) specific B) dynamic C) heroic D) diplomatic
114. This is the nurse who ____ to me when I was ill in hospital.
A) accompanied B) attended C) entertained D) shielded
115. The computer has brought about surprising technological changes ____ we organize and produce information.
A) in a way B) in the way C) in that way D) in no way
116. As a teacher, you should not _______ the students from asking questions in class.
  A) ruin B) restrain C) import D) impose
117. Students with _______ problems may apply for student loans.
  A) economic B) financial C) male D) economical
118. We should make a clear ____ between the two scientific terms for the purpose of our discussion.
A) separation B) discrimination C) deviation D) distinction
119. Radio, television and press ____ of conveying news as information.
A) are the most common three means
B) are the most three common means
C) are the three most common means
D) are three the most common means
120. Many manufacturers were accused of concentrating too heavily on cost reduction, often at the ____ of the quality of their products.
A) expense B) exposure C) expansion D) expectation
121. _____ their differences , the couple were developing an obvious and genuine affection for each other .
A) But for B) For all C) Above all D) Except for
122. Since the matter was extremely _____, we dealt with it immediately.
A) tough B) tense C) urgent D) instant
123. The medicine is on sale everywhere. You can get it at ______ chemist’s.
A) each B) some C) certain D) any
124. With the help of the government , a large number of people ---_______ after the flood in 1991.
 A) survived B) suspended C) suffered D) suspected
125. He always has a lot of _______ ideas in his mind , and sometimes we do not even know what he is thinking about.
 A) novel B) spoil C) acceptable D) additional
126. John _______ to be a polite man. But in fact he is very rude.
 A) pretends B) assures C) affords D) melts
127. A study suggests that even ____ exercise may lead to reduced iron in the blood of women.
A) modern B) moderate C) excess D) excessive
128. Because women often ____ their diet to control weight, they may not consume enough iron-rich food, and are liable to experience a deficiency.
A) restrict B) strict C) stuck D) construct
129. They ____ that the aging population is adding 1 per cent yearly to health service costs.
A) add B) calculate C) add to D) calculate on
130. A ____ is a person who ____ _____.
A) crime; commit; criminal B) commit; criminal; crimes
C) commit; crimes; criminal D) criminal; commits; crimes
131. Earthquake survival supplies include a torch, a spade, some rope and a radio ____.
A) conceiver B) receiver C) perceiver D) deceiver
132. The short story ____ the heart of the little boy with its unusual plot.
A) captured B) cost C) cast D) chased
133. If we say some food is ____, we mean it is safe to eat.
A) ideal B) editable C) ideate D) edible
134. Most people came to realize that it was about time the government ____ further measures to control the population.
A) must take B) is taking C) takes D) took
135. I always ____ what I have said.
A) get to B) hold to C) lead to D) see to
136. There were some ____ flowers on the table.
A) artificial B) unnatural C) false D) unreal
137. Which sport has the most expenses ____ training equipment, players’ personal equipment and uniforms?
A) in place of B) in terms of C) by means of D) by way of
138. In Africa, educational costs are very low for those who are ____ enough to get into universities.
A) ambitious B) fortunate C) aggressive D) substantial
139. If a person talks about his weak points, his listener is expected to say something in the way of ____.
A) persuasion B) remedy C) encourage D) compromise
140. Areas where students have particular difficulty have been treated ____ particular care.
A) by B) in C) under D) with
141. Operations which left patients ____ in need of long periods recovery time now leave them feeling relaxed and comfortable.
A) exhausted B) abandoned C) injured D) deserted
142. Everyone should keep a sense of responsibility ____ what he has done.
A) of B) for C) with D) to
143. I didn’t ____ to take a taxi but I had to as I was late.
A) mean B) assume C) hope D) suppose
144. The French pianist who had been praised very highly ____ to be a great disappointment.
A) turned up B) turned in C) turned out D) turned down
145. I have not heard anything from him since his _______.
 A) departure B) fault C) foundation D) acceptance
146. Keep in __________ that all people are different and some may progress faster than others. A) head B) brain C) heart D) mind
147. Sometimes it is very difficult to _______ some of the English words. Even the native speaker can not help.
 A) decrease B) create C) define D) delight
148. If a person talks about his weak points, his listener is expected to say something in the way of ____.
A) persuasion B) remedy C) encourage D) compromise
149. Within two weeks of arrival, all foreigners had to ____ with the local police.
A) inquire B) register C) consult D) resolve
150. His intelligence and experience will enable him to ____ the complicated situation.
A) cope with B) settle down C) intervene in D) interfere with
二、阅读理解
1.
I left my friend’s house shortly after seven. It was still too early for me to have my evening meal, so I walked along the seafront (滨海马路) for about an hour until I began to feel hungry. By that time I was not far from a favorite restaurant of mine, where I often went to eat two or three times a week. I knew the owner well and frequently complimented (赞美, 恭维) him on his excellent cooking.
I went into the restaurant, which was already crowded, and ordered my meal. While I was waiting for the soup to arrive, I looked around to see if I knew anyone in the restaurant. It was then that I noticed that a man sitting at a corner table near the door kept glancing in my direction, as if he knew me, I certainly did not know him, for I never forgot a face. The man had a newspaper open in front of him, which he was pretending to read, though all the while I could see that he was keeping an eye on me. When the waiter brought my soup, the man was clearly puzzled by the familiar way in which the waiter and I addressed each other. He became even more puzzled as time went on and it grew more and more obvious that I was well known in the restaurant. Eventually he got up and went into the kitchen. After a few minutes he came out again, paid his bill and left without another glance in my direction.
When I had finished and was about to pay my bill, I called the owner of the restaurant over and asked him what the man had wanted. The owner was a little embarrassed by my question and at first did not want to tell me. I insisted. “Well,” he said, “that man was a detective.” “Really?” I said, considerably surprised. “He followed you here because he thought you were a man he was looking for,” the owner of the restaurant said. “When he came into the kitchen, he showed me a photograph of the wanted man. He certainly looked like you! Of course, since we know you here, I was able to convince him that he had made a mistake.” “It’s lucky I came to a restaurant where I am known,” I said, “otherwise I might have been arrested!”
1.When the author got to his favorite restaurant, it was ___________ .
A) already nine o’clock
B) eight o’clock on the dot
C) about two minutes past eight
D) slightly later than eight o’clock
2.The man sitting at the corner table near the door kept glancing in the direction of the author because he was __________________ .
A) interested in the personality of the author
B) making a study of the author
C) looking up and down the author
D) keeping a lookout over the author
3.The author was followed by the detective probably because he ___________ .
A) took after a suspect
B) was similar to a criminal in personality
C) was an accomplice
D) looked like a murderer
4.The detective had a newspaper open in front of him in order to ____________ .
A) read it in detail
B) cover up what he was really doing there
C) have it rechecked
D) wait for his food
5.According to the text, if the author had been a stranger in the restaurant, he would have been ____________________.
A) taken to court
B) followed
C) captured
D) sentenced to a few years’ imprisonment
2.
A very important world problem is the rapidly increasing pressure of population on land and on land resources.
It is not so much the actual population of the world but its rate of increase which is important. It works out to be about 1.6 per cent per annum net increase. In terms of numbers this means something like forty to fifty-five million additional people every year. Canada has a population of twenty million--rather less than six months' climb in world population. Take Australia. There are ten million people in Australia. So, it takes the world less than three months to add to itself a population which peoples that vast country. Let us take our own crowded country--England and Wales: forty-five to fifty million people--just about a year's supply.
By this time tomorrow, and every day, there will be added to the earth about 120,000 extra people, just about the population of the city of York.
This enormous increase of population will create immense problems. By A.D. 2000, unless something desperate happens, there will be as many as 7,000,000,000 people on the surface of this earth! So this is a problem which you are going to see in your lifetime.
Why is this enormous increase in population taking place? It is really due to the spread of the knowledge and the practice of what is coming to be called Death Control. Death Control is something rather different from Birth Control. Death Control recognizes the work of the doctors and the nurses and the hospitals and the health services in keeping alive people who, a few years ago, would have died of some of the incredibly serious killing diseases, as they used to be. Squalid conditions, which we can remedy by an improved standard of living, caused a lot of disease and dirt. Medical examinations at school catch diseases early and ensure healthier school children. Scientists are at work stamping our malaria and other more deadly diseases. If you are seriously ill there is an ambulance to take you to a modern hospital. Medical care helps to keep people alive longer. We used to think seventy was a good age; now eighty, ninety, it may be, are coming to be recognized as a normal age for human beings. People are living longer because of this Death Control, and fewer children are dying, so the population of the world is shooting up.
Imagine the position if you and I and everyone else living on earth shared the surface between us. How much should we have each? It would be just over twelve acres--the sort of size of a small holding. But not all that is useful land which is going to produce food. We can cut out one-fifth of it, for example, as being too cold. That is land which is covered with ice and snow--Antarctica and Greenland and the great frozen areas of northern Canada. Then we can cut out another fifth as being too dry--the great deserts of the world like the Sahara and the heart of Australia and other areas where there is no known water supply to feed crops and so to produce food. Then we can cut out another fifth as being too mountainous or with too great an elevation above sea level. Then we can cut out another tenth as land which has insufficient soil, probably just rock at the surface. Now, out of the twelve acres only about four are left as suitable for producing food.. But not all that is used. It includes land with enough soil and enough rainfall or water, and enough heat which, at present, we are not using, such as, for example, the great Amazon forests and the Congo forest and the grasslands of Africa. How much are we actually using? Only a little over one acre is what is required to support one human being on an average at the present time.
6. The world's population is increasing because _______.
A) the number of babies born every year is about 16 percent of the
total population
B) the birth rate is about 1.6 percent higher than the death rate
C) the birth rate is going up by 1.6 percent per annum
D) the death rate is going down by about 1.6 percent every year
7. The author mentions the different populations of Canada, Australia,
and England and Wales in order to _______.
A) show how small these countries are
B) show how quickly those countries are populated
C) emphasize the low rate of increase of world population
D) emphasize the high rate of increase of world population
8. According to the passage which of the following is not the cause for
death?
A) Poor living condition. B) Fatal diseases like malaria.
C) Poor medical service. D) Less food to feed people.
9. By "Death Control" the author means _______.
A) a rather different kind of Birth Control
B) control of the world's population
C) the prevention or cure of diseases
D) the spread of knowledge in the world
10. From the passage we can conclude _______.
A) the problem of land is not very serious
B) the problem of land can be solved by removing Death Control
C) the problem of land should be solved by reducing the population
D) there is still potential to tap in the use of land
3.
One of the most daring deep-space missions NASA has ever launched is turning out to be one of the least publicized. The target is a large asteroid (小行星) named 1992KD, which orbits the sun millions of miles from Earth. But that destination is almost incidental to the performance of the spacecraft that will make the trip. Though it looks little different from countless other unmanned probes NASA has launched, the ship will be navigated by an electronic brain that has been likened to HAL, the independent-minded computer in the film 2001, and will move through space under power of a system that has long been the stuff of technological fantasies: an ion propulsion (离子推进) engine.
If all goes as planned, Deep Space 1, scheduled for launch later this month, will be the forerunner of a new’ generation of spacecraft. While flight planners hope the ship will make some interesting observations about the target asteroid, including its composition and the structure of its surface, DS1 ‘s primary assignment is to validate a host of new technologies NASA has always considered too risky to try on a mission that may attract a great deal of public attention. Says Mar Rayman of Jet Propulsion Laboratory, DS1’ s chief engineer, “We have an unproven propulsion system, powered by an unproven solar panel, commanded by an unproven navigation system.
What is most remarkable about the spacecraft is how it gets from place to place. After being launched by an ordinary rocket, DS1 will be pushed through space by an engine that works by firing electrons into atoms of xenon gas, stripping each of an electron and giving the atoms an electric charge-ionizing them. The ions are then accelerated through an electric field and emitted from the thrusters at 65,000 m. p. h. Despite that speed, the particles produce little thrust, comparable to the weight of a piece of paper.
11. What is special about NASA’s planned deep-space mission regarding its publicity?
A) It is targeted at a large asteroid.
B) It is much less reported by the media.
C) It is the same as other unmanned probes.
D) It isn’t certain whether it will be successful.
12. What is the primary, purpose of the DS1 mission?
A) Testing new technologies for future spacecraft.
B) Calculating risks for the benefit of other missions.
C) Studying the surface of a large asteroid.
D) Proving a new generation of spacecraft.
13. Once launched, whether the spacecraft will reach its destination is incidental to the performance of all the following EXCEPT ___________.
A) the self-navigation system B) the ion-powered engine
C) the solar cells D) the flight planners
14. How does the DS1 leave the earth’s orbit?
A) By its special propulsion engine.
B) By a conventional rocket engine.
C) By firing electrons into the atoms of xenon gas.
D) By accelerating through an electric field.
15. Which of the following is NOT true according to this article?
A) The author likens the DS1’s navigation system to an electronic brain.
B) The DS1 is the first of a new breed of spacecraft.
C) The DS1 chief engineer has nothing to lose in such a mission.
D) The DS1’s power system used to be the dream of scientists.
4.
A few days ago I asked my sons’ governess(女家庭教师)Julia to come into my study. “Be seated, Julia, ”I said, “Let’s settle our accounts. I guess you most likely need some money, but maybe you’re too polite to mention it. Now then, we agreed on thirty dollars a month...”
  “Forty.”
  “No, thirty. I made a note of it. I always pay our governess thirty. Well, um, you’ve been here two months, so...”
  “Two months and five days.”
  “Exactly two months. I made a special note of it. That means you have sixty dollars coming to you. Take off nine Sundays... you know you didn’t work with Tom on Sundays, you only took walks. And three holidays... ”Julia was biting her finger nail nervously, her face red, but - not a worD.
  “Three holidays, therefore take off twelve dollars. Four days Tom was sick and there were no lessons, as you were occupied only with Dick. Three days you had a toothache and my wife gave you permission not to work after lunch. Twelve and seven - nineteen. Take nineteen off ... that leaves. hmm.... forty one dollars. Correct?”
  Julia’s left eye reddened with tears welling up. Her chin trembled; she coughed nervously and blew her nose, but - still not a worD.
  “Around New Year’s Day you broke a teacup and a saucer; take off two dollars. The cup cost more, it was a treasure of the family, but- forget it. When didn’t I take a loss! Then, due to your neglect (疏忽), Tom climbed a tree and tore his jacket; take away ten. Also due to your carelessness the maid stole Dick’s shoes. You ought to watch everything! You get paid for it. So, that means five more dollars off. The tenth of January I gave ten dollars.”
  “You didn’t. ”sobbed JuliA.
  “But I made a note of it.”
  “Well... if you say so.”
  “Take twenty seven from forty one -that leaves fourteen.”
  Both her eyes were filled with tears. Beads of sweat stood on the thin pretty little nose. Poor girl!
  “Only once was I given any money,” she whispered, her voice trembling, “and that was by your wife. Three dollars, nothing more.”
  “Really? You see now, and I didn’t know that! Take three from fourteen.. leaves eleven. Here’s your money, my dear. Three, three, three, one and one. Here it is !”
  I handed her eleven dollars. She took them and pocketed them.
  “Merci (法语: 谢谢),”she whispereD.
  I jumped to my feet and started pacing the room. I was overcome with anger. “For what, this - ‘merci’?” I askeD.
  “For the money. ”
  “But you know I’ve cheated you - robbed you ! I have actually stolen from you ! Why this‘merci’?”
  “In my other places they didn’t give me anything at all.”
  “They didn’t give you anything? No wonder! I played a little joke on you, a cruel lesson, just to teach you... I m going to give you all the eighty dollars! Here they are in the envelope all ready for you... Is it really possible to be so spineless (懦弱)?Why didn’t you protest? Why were you silent? Is it possible in this world to be without teeth and claws(爪)-to be such a fool?”
  Embarrassed, she smileD. And I could read her expression,“It is possible.”
  I asked her pardon for the cruel lesson and, to her great surprise, gave her the eighty dollars. She murmured her little“merci”several times and went out. I looked after her and thought,“How easy it is to crush the weak in this world !”
16.While talking to Julia, the wrier expected from her ________.
  A. a protest           B. gratitude
  C. obedience           D. an explanation
17.What shocked the writer was Julia’s ________.
  A. nervousness in front of her boss
  B. acceptance of injustice
  C. shyness when talking about money
  D. reluctance to express herself
18.The writer said, “Is it possible in this world to be without teeth and claws?” He was actually telling the governess ________.
  A. to be more aggressive
  B. to be more careful in her work
  C. to protect her right
  D. to live independently
19.At the end of the story, the writer said,“ How easy it is to crush the weak in this world!”to show ________.
  A. his understanding of Julia’s anxiety
  B. his worry about Julia’s future
  C. his concern on the living condition of working - class people
  D. his sympathy for the mental state of those exploited
20.From the story, we can tell that Julia’s employer was ________.
  A. greedy but honest
  B. ill - tempered but warm - hearted
  C. strict but forgiving
  D. none of the above
5.
Faces, like fingerprints, are unique. Did you ever wonder how it is possible for us to recognize people? Even a skilled writer probably could not describe all the features that make one face different from another. Yet a very young child-or even an animal, such as a pigeon-can learn to recognize faces, we all take this ability for granted.
We also tell people apart by how they behave. When we talk about someone’s personality, we mean the ways in which he or she acts, speaks, thinks and feels that make that individual different from other.
Like the human face, human personality is very complex. But describing someone’s personality in words is somewhat easier than describing his face. If you were asked to describe what a “nice face” looked like, you probably would have a difficult time doing so.
But if you were asked to describe a “nice person”, you might begin to think about someone who was kind, considerate, friendly, warm, and so forth.
There are many words to describe how a person thinks, feels and acts. Fordin Allport, an American psychologist, found nearly 18,000 English words charactering differences in people’s behavior. And many of us use this information as a basis for describing, or typing, his personality. Bookworms, conservatives, military types-people are described with such terms.
People have always tried to “type” each other. Actors in early Greek drama wore masks to show the audience whether they played the villains or the hero’s role. In fact, the words “person” and “personality” come from the Latin persona, meaning “mask”. Today most television and movie actors do not wear masks. But we easily tell the “good guys” from the “bad guys” because the two types differ in appearance as well as in actions.
21. By using the simile (直喻) of fingerprints, the author tells us that _____.
A) people differ from each other in facial features
B) people have difficulty in describing the features of fingerprints
C) people have different personalities
D) people can learn to recognize faces
22. According to this passage, some animals have the gift of _____.
A) typing each other
B) telling people apart by how they behave
C) recognizing human faces
D) telling good people from bad people
23. Who most probably knows best hw to describe people’s personality?
A) Psychologists. B) The modern TV audience.
C) The ancient Greek audience D) The movie star.
24. According to the passage, it is possible for us to tell one type of person form another because _____.
A) human faces have complex features
B) people differ in their behavioral and physical characteristics
C) human fingerprints provide unique information
D) people’s behavior can be easily described in words
25. Which of the following is the major point of the passage?
A) How to get to know people.
B) Why it is necessary to identify people’s personality.
C) Hoe best to recognize people.
D) Why it is possible to describe people.
6.
At Harton College---an English boarding school for boys---there are many rules. Fifteen-year-old Bob Sanders often breaks these rules.
The boys can go into town in the afternoon after classes. But they must return to the school at six o’clock. One afternoon Bob walked to the town. He looked at the shops and then went to the cinema. After the film he looked at his watch. It was after eight o’clock. He was a little worried. He walked back to Harton College as fast as possible.
When he arrived, he ran quickly to the main entrance. It was locked. He looked up at the window of his dormitory. It was on the third floor. The window was open. But it was quite dark and he went round the school building to another door. That one was locked too. He couldn’t climb up the wall very easily. Then he saw another open window on the ground floor. It was the window of the headmaster’s study.
He looked into the room-----no one was there. Bob quickly climbed on to the window sill (窗台) and jumped into the room. Just then he heard a noise. Then some one turned on a light in the corridor. Bob looked around and then hid under the sofa. One minute later, Mr. Mannering, the headmaster, came in. He turned on the light on his desk, and sat down on the sofa. Then he opened a book and began to read.
Bob lay under the sofa as quietly as possible. He could not move. The floor was cold and uncomfortable. He looked at the headmaster’s shoes and socks for an hour.
“Why doesn’t he get up and go to bed?” he thought.
Finally, the headmaster closed his book and stood up. He put the book on a shelf and walked towards the door.
“Thank heavens, he didn’t find me under the sofa!” thought Bob.
Then Mr. Mannering stopped and spoke towards the sofa. “Would you turn off the light when you leave?” he said and left the study.
26.According to the passage, it is required that students of Harton College _________ .
A) come back to the college at six o’clock if they go to town after classes
B) may stay out until midnight if they like
C) should leave school when class is over
D) may do whatever they like
27.When Bob realized it was too late to return to Harton College as required, it was already ___________ .
A) 8:00 B) 9:00 C) later than 8:00 D) midnight
28.Bob stole into the courtyard of his college by means of ________ .
A) the main entrance
B) going around the school building to another door
C) jumping over the wall
D) climbing into the window of his headmaster’s study
29.Bob hid himself under the sofa probably because he was afraid of ______________ .
A) being punished for his theft
B) being found to have returned late
C) being dismissed for his wrongdoing
D) being capture alive on the spot
30.In the light of what his headmaster said towards the sofa, it can be safely concluded that the headmaster had already ________________ .
A) excused Bob
B) forgiven Bob
C) found Bob hiding under the sofa
D) punished Bob
7.
“Most experiences of absent - mindedness-forgetting where you left something or wondering why you just entered a room-are caused by a simple lack of attention, ” says Schacter. “You’re supposed to remember something, but you haven’t encoded(编码) it deeply.”
  Encoding, Schacter explains, is a special way of paying attention to an event that has a major impression on recalling it later. Failure to encode properly can create troublesome situations. If you put your mobile phone in a pocket, for example, and don’t pay attention to what you did because you’re involved in a conversation, you’ll probably forget that the phone is in the jacket now hanging in your cupboarD.“ Your memory itself isn’t failing you, ” says Schacter, “Rather, you didn’t give your memory system the information it needeD.”
  Lack of interest can also lead to absent -mindedness. “A man who can recite sports statistics from 30 years ago, ” says Zelinski, “ may not remember to drop a letter in the mailbox.”Women have slightly better memories than men, possibly because they pay more attention to their environment, and memory relies on just that.
  “Visual cues( 视觉提示 )can help prevent absent- mindedness, ”says Schacter, “But be sure the cue is clear and available. ”If you want to remember to take a medicine with lunch, put the pill bottle on the kitchen table-don’t leave it in the medicine box and write yourself a note that you keep in a pocket.
  Another common experience of absent - mindedness: walking into a room and wondering why you’re there. Most likely, you were thinking about something else. “Everyone does this from time to time, ”says Zelinski. “The best thing to do is to return to where you were before entering the room, and you’ll likely remember.”
 31.The writer of the passage thinks that encoding properly is very important because ________.
  A. it enables us to recall something from our memory
  B. it slows down the process of losing our memory
  C. it helps us understand our memory system better
  D. it helps us to get back to where we were
 32.One possible reason why women have a little better memories than men is that________.
  A. they rely more on the environment
  B. they have a wider range of interests
  C. they have an unusual power of focusing their attention
  D. they are more interested in what’s happening around them
 33.Why can a note in the pocket hardly serve as a reminder? ________.
  A. It will easily get lost
  B. It is out of your sight
  C. It’s not clear enough for you to read
  D. It might get mixed up with other things
 34.From the last paragraph we can learn that________.
  A. repetition might help improve our memory
  B. memory depends to a certain extent on the environment
  C. we’d better return to where we were if we forget things
  D. we should think about something else while doing one thing
35.The passage is mainly about ________.
  A. the memory system of persons
  B. a way of encoding and recalling
  C. the causes of absent - mindedness
  D. the impression of the environment on memory
8.
It has been said that no town grows up until it is home to a college or university. Knowing this, as early as 1944, far-sighted community leaders began to plan for and raise money for the creation of a junior college in Columbus. In February of 1958 the Georgia Legislature passed the Junior College Bill(法案), which stipulated that all colleges qualifying for state funding must be in operation by September of 1958.
It was a challenge to meet the deadline, but on September 22, 1958, Columbus came of age: Columbus College began classes in the old Shanon Hosiery Mill, with 13 faculty members, five academic programs and 227 students. The phenomenal growth of the college began. In 1960, the first class of graduates received their associate degrees. In 1963, the college relocated to its present site. In 1965, the college was authorized to move up to the four-year status, and 1966 saw the first enrollment in a bachelor’s degree program. In 1973, the first graduate students began classes leading to the Master of Education degree and finally, two years ago, Columbus College became Columbus State University.
Some of the benefits from the university to our town are obvious-the spreading of knowledge and culture, skills and technology through college and advanced courses that students are able to take locally.
A major benefit from the university to our town is not so obvious, perhaps. Hundreds of highly educated and talented faculty and staff have become citizens of our area, contributing their skills, expertise and viewpoints to the common good of the community and generally promoted the progress of the area in a number of diverse ways.
Looking back over 40 years of growth, and forward into the next century, the dream of those leaders who had the foresight to bring the college to Columbus has been fulfilled beyond their dreams.
36. The idea that prompted the community leaders in Columbus to plan for the creation of a college is that __________.
A) towns can grow very large if they have a college
B) the town must have a college for their own benefit
C) a town cannot be fully developed without a college
D) foresight is essential when they plan for the college
37. Columbus College began classes in September, 1958 so that it obtained financial support from __________.
A) citizens of the Columbus area B) the state government
C) private companies D) students’ tuition
38. How-many years did it take the students at Columbus College to receive an associate degree?
A) Two years. B) Three years. C) Four years. D) Seven years.
39. The meaning of the word “phenomenal” (Para. 2) can be expressed by ________.
A) remarkable B) surprising C) far-sighted D) hasty
40. The writer’s purpose in writing this article is most likely to
A) recount the university’s history
B) celebrate the university’ s 40th anniversary.
C) ask more students to attend the university
D) show the importance of the university to the town’s residents
9.
Animals other than humans have not developed communications comparable to human languagA. But is it possible that other animals have the capacity to learn a language if they are adequately taught? Obviously, this is a fascination notion. The idea of communicating directly with another species has long been a part of human folklore and children’s fantasies. But on a scientific level, the question of whether animals can learn a language is important primarily because it relates to the controversy()between the cognitive and the learning approaches to languagA. If language is dependent on and is actually an outgrowth of the intellectual structure of the human mind, there is the strong supposition that only humans are capable of using languagA. Therefore, Noam Chomsky and other psycholinguists have argued that only humans can learn a language, while most behaviorists feel that with sufficient patience it should be possible to teach an animal some sort of languagA. Although the two schools of thought clearly differ on this point, it is not really a crucial test of the two theories. If a chimpanzee can master a simple language all it would mean is that the chimp’s intellectual capacity and brain structure are more similar to ours than we thought. It would not necessarily imply that our intellectual structure is unimportant in our own mastery of languagA. Thus, teaching an animal language is an impressive demonstration of the power of learning techniques, but it is not evidence that language is developed entirely through learning.
On the other hand, the question of whether other animals can learn a language is fascination in its own right, aside from its value as a test of the two theories of language development. Accordingly, whatever one’s position on the theoretical dispute, we must consider training an animal to use language a dramatic accomplishment.
41.Which of the following statements is the view of psycholinguists?
A. The cognitive view of language learning says that only human beings can learn language because it is an outgrowth of the structure of the human minD.
B. Other animals simply could master a languagA.
C. The animals intellectual capacity is much better than human beings.
D. Language is developed by learning.
42.The behaviorists’ view is that __________.
A. language is actually an outgrowth of intellectual structure of the animal’s mind
B. animals have not developed communications system
C. given enough patience, a man should be able to teach an animal some sort of language
D. only human beings can learn language
43.That an animal can master a simple language means that __________.
A. human’s intellectual structure is not important
B. animals’ intellectual capacity and brain structure are more similar to the humans’
C. the learning techniques are much more important
D. language is developed completely by learning
44.The main idea of paragraph two is ___________.
A. teaching a chimp language is not crucial test of the two theories
B. their brain structure is not similar to human
C. using various methods to let the chimp master a language
D. training a nonhuman to use language is an amazing accomplishment
45.The best title for this passage would be _________.
A. Animals’ language
B. Human’s language
C. Teaching Animals’ Language
D. Can Other Animals Acquire Language?
10.
40 years ago the idea of disabled people doing sport was never heard of. But when the annual games for the disabled were started as Stoke Mandeville, England in 1948 by Sir Ludwig Guttmann, the situation began to change.
Sir Ludwig Guttmann, who had been driven to England in 1939 from Nazi German, had been asked by the British government to set up an injuries centre at Stoke Mandeville Hospital near London. His ideas about treating injuries included sport for the disabled.
In the first games just two teams of injured soldiers took part. The next year, 1949, five teams took part. From those beginnings, thing have developed fast. Teams now come from abroad to Stoke Mandeville every year. In 1960 the first Olympics for the disabled were held in Rome. In the same place was the normal Olympic Games. Now, every four years the Olympic Games for the Disabled are held, if possible, in the same place as the normal Olympic Games, although they are organized separately. In other years Games for the Disabled are still held at Stoke Mandeville. In the 1984 wheelchair Olympic Games, 1064 wheelchair athletes from about 40 countries took part. Unfortunately, they were held at Stoke Mandeville and not in Los Angeles, along with the other Olympics.
The Games have been a great success in promoting international friendship and understanding, and in proving that being disabled does not mean you can’t enjoy sport. One small source of disappointment for those who organize, and take part in the games, however, has been the unwillingness of the International Olympic Committee to include disabled events at the Olympic Games for the able-bodied. Perhaps a few more year are still needed to convince those fortune enough not to be disabled that their disabled fellow athletes should not be excluded.
46. The first games for the disabled were held _____ after Sir Ludwig Guttmann arrived in England.
A) 40 years B) 21 years C) 10 years D) 9 years
47. Besides Stoke Mandeville, surely the games for the disabled were once held in _____.
A) New York B) London C) Rome D) Los Angeles
48. In Paragraph 3, the word athletes’ means____
A) People who support the games
B) People who watch the games
C) People who organize the games
D) People who compete in the games
49. Which of the following statements is NOT true?
A) Sir Ludwig Guttmann is an early organizer of the games for the disabled.
B) Sir Ludwig Guttmann is an injured soldier.
C) Sir Ludwig Guttmann is from Germany.’
D) Sir Ludwig Guttmann is welcomed by the British government.
50. From the passage, we may conclude that the writer is _____.
A) One of the organizers of the games for the disabled.
B) A disabled person who once took part in the games.
C) Against holding the games for the disabled.
D) In favor of holding the games for the disabled.
11.
I left my friend’s house shortly after seven. It was still too early for me to have my evening meal, so I walked along the seafront (滨海马路) for about an hour until I began to feel hungry. By that time I was not far from a favorite restaurant of mine, where I often went to eat two or three times a week. I knew the owner well and frequently complimented (赞美, 恭维) him on his excellent cooking.
I went into the restaurant, which was already crowded, and ordered my meal. While I was waiting for the soup to arrive, I looked around to see if I knew anyone in the restaurant. It was then that I noticed that a man sitting at a corner table near the door kept glancing in my direction, as if he knew me, I certainly did not know him, for I never forgot a face. The man had a newspaper open in front of him, which he was pretending to read, though all the while I could see that he was keeping an eye on me. When the waiter brought my soup, the man was clearly puzzled by the familiar way in which the waiter and I addressed each other. He became even more puzzled as time went on and it grew more and more obvious that I was well known in the restaurant. Eventually he got up and went into the kitchen. After a few minutes he came out again, paid his bill and left without another glance in my direction.
When I had finished and was about to pay my bill, I called the owner of the restaurant over and asked him what the man had wanted. The owner was a little embarrassed by my question and at first did not want to tell me. I insisted. “Well,” he said, “that man was a detective.” “Really?” I said, considerably surprised. “He followed you here because he thought you were a man he was looking for,” the owner of the restaurant said. “When he came into the kitchen, he showed me a photograph of the wanted man. He certainly looked like you! Of course, since we know you here, I was able to convince him that he had made a mistake.” “It’s lucky I came to a restaurant where I am known,” I said, “otherwise I might have been arrested!”
51.When the author got to his favorite restaurant, it was ___________ .
A) already nine o’clock
B) eight o’clock on the dot
C) about two minutes past eight
D) slightly later than eight o’clock
52.The man sitting at the corner table near the door kept glancing in the direction of the author because he was __________________ .
A) interested in the personality of the author
B) making a study of the author
C) looking up and down the author
D) keeping a lookout over the author
53.The author was followed by the detective probably because he ___________ .
A) took after a suspect
B) was similar to a criminal in personality
C) was an accomplice
D) looked like a murderer
54.The detective had a newspaper open in front of him in order to ____________ .
A) read it in detail
B) cover up what he was really doing there
C) have it rechecked
D) wait for his food
55.According to the text, if the author had been a stranger in the restaurant, he would have been ____________________.
A) taken to court
B) followed
C) captured
D) sentenced to a few years’ imprisonment
12.
Man young British doctors drink too much and use cannabis and other illegal drugs, according to a survey released last week.
The poll of 14 junior doctors in northeastern England, published in a letter in The Lancet medical journal, showed that more than 60 per cent drank more alcohol than the recommended safe limits.
Over 35 per cent of male doctors and 19 per cent of female physicians also admitted using cannabis and up to 13 per cent also took other drugs.
“The current drinking habits, illegal drug use, and stress in some junior doctors is of concern, not only for their own well being, but also how they affect patients’ care,” said Dr. Farhad Kam all of the University of Newcastle, who conducted the study.
The British Medical Association (BMA) said the findings were consistent with its own research into the habits of the junior doctors.
The survey was released a day after Dr. Patrick Dixon, a British AIDS expert and author, called for random testing of doctors for alcohol and drug abuse.
EXxon, the author of The Truth about Drugs, said that the problem, posed a significant threat to the public health because patients’ lives were being put at risk.
“With around 10 per cent of all doctors either intoxicated(沉醉)or withdrawing (from drugs or alcohol) we are faced with the fact that significant numbers of doctors have impaired judgment because of addiction,” Dixon said in a telephone interview.
He claimed that more than 1,000 addicted doctors in London were addicts but he said their colleagues were reluctant to identify them because of fear of retribution (报复).
“Our estimate is that up to 10 percent of doctors may have a drug or alcohol problem at some time in their working lives,” a BMA spokeswoman said.
56. From the first paragraph, we can know ________________.
A) it is quite fashionable to take cannabis in Britain
B) taking cannabis is against the law in Britain
C) cannabis is something delicious to eat
D) there is no limit to the use of cannabis
57. What does the word “released” (Para. 6) mean?
A) Set free. B) Given up. C) Finished. D) Issued.
58. According to Dr. Dixon, alcohol drinking and drug abuse ___________.
A) put the health of the drinkers and users at risk
B) had negative influence over the younger doctors
C) presented a great threat to the public health
D) was a pretty new social phenomenon in Britain
59. The word “impaired” (Para. 8) means ____________.
A) irresponsible B) weakened C) false D) paired up
60. The colleagues of the addicted doctors were unwilling to identify them because they _____________.
A) did not want to lose friendship
B) lacked self-confidence
C) didn’t want to get punished
D) didn’t’ t want the addicted doctors to be punished
13.
One of the most daring deep-space missions NASA has ever launched is turning out to be one of the least publicized. The target is a large asteroid (小行星) named 1992KD, which orbits the sun millions of miles from Earth. But that destination is almost incidental to the performance of the spacecraft that will make the trip. Though it looks little different from countless other unmanned probes NASA has launched, the ship will be navigated by an electronic brain that has been likened to HAL, the independent-minded computer in the film 2001, and will move through space under power of a system that has long been the stuff of technological fantasies: an ion propulsion (离子推进) engine.
If all goes as planned, Deep Space 1, scheduled for launch later this month, will be the forerunner of a new’ generation of spacecraft. While flight planners hope the ship will make some interesting observations about the target asteroid, including its composition and the structure of its surface, DS1 ‘s primary assignment is to validate a host of new technologies NASA has always considered too risky to try on a mission that may attract a great deal of public attention. Says Mar Rayman of Jet Propulsion Laboratory, DS1’ s chief engineer, “We have an unproven propulsion system, powered by an unproven solar panel, commanded by an unproven navigation system.
What is most remarkable about the spacecraft is how it gets from place to place. After being launched by an ordinary rocket, DS1 will be pushed through space by an engine that works by firing electrons into atoms of xenon gas, stripping each of an electron and giving the atoms an electric charge-ionizing them. The ions are then accelerated through an electric field and emitted from the thrusters at 65,000 m. p. h. Despite that speed, the particles produce little thrust, comparable to the weight of a piece of paper.
61. What is special about NASA’s planned deep-space mission regarding its publicity?
A) It is targeted at a large asteroid.
B) It is much less reported by the media.
C) It is the same as other unmanned probes.
D) It isn’t certain whether it will be successful.
62. What is the primary, purpose of the DS1 mission?
A) Testing new technologies for future spacecraft.
B) Calculating risks for the benefit of other missions.
C) Studying the surface of a large asteroid.
D) Proving a new generation of spacecraft.
63. Once launched, whether the spacecraft will reach its destination is incidental to the performance of all the following EXCEPT ___________.
A) the self-navigation system B) the ion-powered engine
C) the solar cells D) the flight planners
64. How does the DS1 leave the earth’s orbit?
A) By its special propulsion engine.
B) By a conventional rocket engine.
C) By firing electrons into the atoms of xenon gas.
D) By accelerating through an electric field.
65. Which of the following is NOT true according to this article?
A) The author likens the DS1’s navigation system to an electronic brain.
B) The DS1 is the first of a new breed of spacecraft.
C) The DS1 chief engineer has nothing to lose in such a mission.
D) The DS1’s power system used to be the dream of scientists.
14.
Most young people enjoy some forms of physical activity. It may be walking, cycling or swimming, or in winter skating or skiing. It may be a game of some kind-foot-ball, hockey, golf, or tennis. It may be mountaineering(登山).
Those who have a passion for climbing high and difficult mountains are often looked upon with astonishment. Why are men and women willing to suffer cold and hardship, and to take risks on high mountains? This astonishment is caused probably by the difference between mountaineering and other forms of activity to which men give their leisure.
Mountaineering is a sport and not a game. There are no man made rules, as there are for such games as golf and football. There are, of course, rules of a different kind which it would be dangerous to ignore, but it is this freedom from man-made rules that makes mountaineering attractive to many people. Those who climb mountains are free to use their own methods.
If we compare mountaineering and other more familiar sports, we might think that one big difference is that mountaineering is not a “team game”. We should be mistaken in this. There are, it is true, no “matches” between “teams” of climbers, but when climbers are on a rock face linked by a rope on which their lives may depend, there is obviously teamwork.
The mountain climber knows that he may have to fight forces that are stronger and are powerful than man. He has to fight the forces of nature. His sport requires high mental and physical qualities.
A mountain climber continues to improve in skill year after year. A skier if probably past his best by the age of thirty, and most international tennis champions are in their early twenties. But it is not unusual for a man of fifty or sixty to climb the highest mountains in the Alps. They may take more time that younger men, but they probably climb with more skill and less waste of effort, and they certainly experience equal enjoyment.
66. Mountaineering involves everything EXCEPT ______________.
A) cold B) hardship C) risk D) astonishment
67. The difference between a sport and a game has to do with the kind of __________.
A) activity B) rules C) uniform D) participants
68. Mountaineering can be called a team sport because _________.
A) it is an Olympic event
B) teams compete against each other
C) mountaineers depend on each other while climbing
D) there are 5 climbers on each team
69. Mountaineers compete against __________.
A) nature B) each other C) other teams D) international standards
70. The best title for the passage is ___________.
A) Mountaineering Is Different from Golf and Football
B) Mountaineering Is More Attractive than Other Sports
C) Mountaineering
D) Mountain Climbers
15.
Faces, like fingerprints, are unique. Did you ever wonder how it is possible for us to recognize people? Even a skilled writer probably could not describe all the features that make one face different from another. Yet a very young child-or even an animal, such as a pigeon-can learn to recognize faces, we all take this ability for granted.
We also tell people apart by how they behave. When we talk about someone’s personality, we mean the ways in which he or she acts, speaks, thinks and feels that make that individual different from other.
Like the human face, human personality is very complex. But describing someone’s personality in words is somewhat easier than describing his face. If you were asked to describe what a “nice face” looked like, you probably would have a difficult time doing so.
But if you were asked to describe a “nice person”, you might begin to think about someone who was kind, considerate, friendly, warm, and so forth.
There are many words to describe how a person thinks, feels and acts. Fordin Allport, an American psychologist, found nearly 18,000 English words charactering differences in people’s behavior. And many of us use this information as a basis for describing, or typing, his personality. Bookworms, conservatives, military types-people are described with such terms.
People have always tried to “type” each other. Actors in early Greek drama wore masks to show the audience whether they played the villains or the hero’s role. In fact, the words “person” and “personality” come from the Latin persona, meaning “mask”. Today most television and movie actors do not wear masks. But we easily tell the “good guys” from the “bad guys” because the two types differ in appearance as well as in actions.
71. By using the simile (直喻) of fingerprints, the author tells us that _____.
A) people differ from each other in facial features
B) people have difficulty in describing the features of fingerprints
C) people have different personalities
D) people can learn to recognize faces
72. According to this passage, some animals have the gift of _____.
A) typing each other
B) telling people apart by how they behave
C) recognizing human faces
D) telling good people from bad people
73. Who most probably knows best hw to describe people’s personality?
A) Psychologists. B) The modern TV audience.
C) The ancient Greek audience D) The movie star.
74. According to the passage, it is possible for us to tell one type of person form another because _____.
A) human faces have complex features
B) people differ in their behavioral and physical characteristics
C) human fingerprints provide unique information
D) people’s behavior can be easily described in words
75. Which of the following is the major point of the passage?
A) How to get to know people.
B) Why it is necessary to identify people’s personality.
C) Hoe best to recognize people.
D) Why it is possible to describe people.
16.
Many visitors finds the fast pace at which American people move very troubling. One's first impression is likely to be that everyone is in a rush .City people always appear to be hurrying to get where they are going and are very impatient if they are delayed even for a brief moment. At first, this may seem unfriendly to you . But drivers will rush you ; storekeepers will be in a hurry as they serve you ; people will push past you as they walk along the street . You will miss smiles, brief conversations with people as you shop or dine away from home . Do not think that because Americans are in such a hurry they are unfriendly. Often , life is much slower outside the big cities, as is true in other countries as well. Americans who live in cities such as New York, Chicago, or Los Angeles, often think that everyone is equally in a hurry to get things done; they expect others to "push back", just as city people do in Tokyo, Singapore or Paris, for example . But when they discover that you are a stranger, most Americans become quite kindly and will take great care to help you. Many of them first came to the city as strangers and they remember how frightening a new city can be .If you need help or want to ask a question , choose a friendly looking person and say," I am a stranger here. Can you help me ?" Most people will stop, smile at you, and help you find you way or answer your questions. But you must let them know that you need help. Otherwise they are likely to pass you by, not noticing that you are new to the city and in need of help. Occasionally, you may find someone too busy or perhaps too rushed to give you aid. If this happens, do not be discouraged; just ask someone else. Most Americans enjoy helping a stranger.
76. Many people who first visit the United States will find that _______. A) America is a highly developed country B) American city people seem to be always in a rush C) the fast pace in American life often causes much trouble D) Americans are impatient and unfriendly people 77.When the author says " You will miss smile ", he means ___________. A) you will fail to notice that Americans are pleasant and happy B) you will be puzzled why Americans do not smile at you C) you will feel that Americans do not seem very friendly D) you will find that Americans don't have much sense of humor 78. In the author's opinion, ___________. A) it is true that life in New York is much faster than that in any other city B) people living outside big cities are lazy and miserable C) most American people enjoy living in the suburbs of big cities D) those who are busy are not necessarily unfriendly 79 The author mentions big cities such as Tokyo, Singapore and Paris ___________. A) to show that city people all over the world have a lot in common B) to let his readers be aware that they are some of the world's biggest cities C) to illustrate their difference from American cities D) because they are some of the cities that attract visitors most 80. If you say to an American that you are a stranger there, most probably be will _________. A) offer his help B) stop smiling at you C) help you find the way D) reply that he is pleased to meet you
17.
In response to his summons(传唤,召唤), I had entered the room and shut the door quietly behind me. There was a pause of complete stillness in which the buzzing (嗡嗡声)of the bees among the pink roses sounded as loud as a flight of aircraft.
I said, “Grandfather?” on a note of painful hesitation.
His voice was harsh when he spoke, and the words uncompromising, but I had seen him wet his lips and make the attempt twice, “Well, Annabel?”
I went quickly across the room and knelt down beside the sofa and put my hands on his lap on top of the plaid(方格呢)rug. His thin hand, with its prominent blue-knotted veins(静脉), came down hard over mine, surprisingly strong and warm.
In the end it was easy to know what to say. I said quite simply, “I’m sorry, Grandfather. Will you have me hack?”
The hand moved, holding mine together even more tightly. “If I said no,” said Grandfather, “it would be no more than you deserve.” He cleared his throat violently. “We thought you were dead.”
“I’m sorry.”
His other hand reached forward and lifted my chin. He studied my face, turning it towards the light of the window. I bit my lip and waited, not meeting his gaze. He said nothing for a long time, then, as harshly as before, “You’ve been unhappy, haven’t you?”
I nodded. He let me go, and at last I was able to put my forehead down on the rug so that he couldn’t see my face. He said, “So have we,” and fell silent patting my hand.
81. The passage is taken from a story about a girl who has _____________.
A) had a date and returned home late
B) got married and come to see her grandfather
C) made her grandfather angry and now come to apologize
D) run away from home and returned
82. We can infer from the passage that when .Annabel enters the room she _________.
A) doesn’t know what to say to her grandfather
B) believes her grandfather will forgive her
C) is prepared to get a good scolding
D) is surprised that her grandfather is so easy to talk to
83. In the passage, the “rug” (Para. 4) is ___________.
A) a floor covering B) a kind of blanket
C) a tablecloth D) a cushion
84. We can infer from the passage that Annabel’s grandfather ____________.
A) is very strict with her
B) is too uncompromising to excuse anyone’s mistakes
C) is passionless
D) has tender affection for Annabel
85. Which of the following best descries the relationship between Annabel and her family?
A) Annabel’s family treats her unfairly.
B) Annabel and her family resent one another.
C) Annabel and her family love each other.
D) Annabel and her family will never yield to each other.
18.
Today’s kids absorb lots of messages, values and attitudes from the media and from friends. Advertisements whet their appetite for many things they don’t need. What they do need is an understanding of the value of the dollar.
How do kids learn to be economically savvy (机智的) ? Most schools do not teach the financial facts of life; it’s up to parents to help kids grow into responsible and skillful money earners, savers and spenders.
To learn about money, kids first need to have some. Early on, parents often hand out money on an as-needed basis. But experts say paying a regular allowance is the best way to teach children the meaning of money, how to use it and how to plan. Some call it “learning capital”.
A child is ready for an allowance around age five or six, when he becomes aware of the relationship between money and shopping, can differentiate coins, can add and subtract, has spending opportunities and asks parents to buy him things.
How much allowance? Some experts recommend giving a dollar for each year of age, but Sharon Danes, a professor at the University of Minnesota disagrees: “I think $ 5 a week is too much for a five-year-old, and $15 is probably not enough for a 15-year-old.” What’s right for the child depends on three factors: the child’s level of development, what the parents can afford, and what the parents expect him to pay for.
Whatever the amount, kids will soon feel they need more. But Sharon Danes insists that children don’t need an automatic raise each year. “There’s no lesson to be learned when children expect an increase just because they’re a year older,” she says. “The reason for getting a greater part of the family-income pie is so they can learn more about balancing demands and resources.”
86. In Para. 1, “whet their appetite” most probably means ____________.
A) make them wish for more B) spoil their appetite
C) sharpen their sensation D) stimulate their consuming power
87. What is the best way for children to learn to be economically savvy?
A) Parents don’t give them money until they really need it.
B) Children are taught the financial facts of life at school.
C) Parents regularly give them a certain amount of money.
D) Parents help children become skillful money earners.
88. At the age of five or six, children are capable of all the following EXCEPT _____.
A) identifying the face value of money
B) solving simple arithmetic problems
C) knowing that with money they can get things from stores
D) going shopping themselves
89. What is Professor Sharon Danes’ attitude toward the proposal of giving children a dollar for each year of age?
A) She believes this will surely encourage children to ask for more.
B) She doubts whether there is such thing as “right amount” for parents to give to their children.
C) She thinks it is unnecessary to increase the amount each year.
D) She insists that children can only get money when they study well.
90. Which of the following is closest in meaning to the last sentence of the passage?
A) The purpose of giving children money is to let them know more about how to use money and how to plan.
B) If they want to get more from the family income, they must have enough knowledge of family economy.
C) Children can get more money on the condition that they are able to balance demands and resources.
D) To give children more money is to make them understand the importance of balancing demands and resources.
19.
Suppose we built a robot (机器人) to explore the planet Mars. We provide the robot with seeing detectors to keep it away from danger. It is powered entirely by the sun. Should we program the robot to be equally active at all times? No. The robot would be using up energy at a time when it was not receiving any. So we would probably program it to cease its activity at night and to wake up at dawn the next morning.
According to the evolutionary (进化的) theory of sleep, evolution equipped us with a regular pattern of sleeping and waking for the same reason. The theory does not deny (否认) that sleep provides some important restorative functions. It merely says that evolution has programmed us to perform those functions at a time when activity would be inefficient and possibly dangerous. However, sleep protects us only from the sort of trouble we might walk into; it does not protect us from trouble that comes looking for us. So we sleep well when we are in familiar, safe place, but we sleep lightly, if at all, when we fear that bears will nose into the tent.
The evolutionary theory accounts well for differences in sleep among creatures. Why do cats, for instance, sleep so much, while horses sleep so little? Surely cats do not need five times as much repair and restoration as horses do. But cats can afford to have long periods of inactivity because they spend little time eating and are unlikely to be attacked while they sleep. Horses must spend almost all their waking hours eating, because what they eat is very low in energy value. Moreover, they cannot afford to sleep too long or too deeply, because their survival depends on their ability to run away from attackers.
91. The author uses the example of the robot in space exploration to tell us ______.
A) the differences between robots and men
B) the reason why men need to sleep
C) about the need for robots to save power
D) about the danger of men working at night
92. Evolution has programmed man to sleep at night chiefly to help him ______.
A) maintain a regular pattern of life
B) prevent trouble that comes looking for him
C) avoid danger and inefficient labor
D) restore his bodily functions
93. According to the author, we cannot sleep well when we _____.
A) are worrying about our safety
B) are overworked
C) are in a tent
D) are away from home
94. Cats sleep much more than horses do partly because cats _____.
A) need more time for restoration
B) are unlikely to be attackers
C) are more active than horses when they are awake
D) spend less time eating to get enough energy
95. Which of the following is the main idea of the passage? ______.
A) Evolution has equipped all creatures with a regular pattern of sleeping and waking.
B) The study of sleep is an important part of the evolutionary theory.
C) Sleeping patterns must be taken into consideration in the designing of robots.
D) The sleeping pattern of a living creature is determined by the food it eats.
20.
For some time past it has been widely accepted that babies-and other creatures-learn to do things because certain acts lead to “rewards”; and there is no reason to doubt that this is true. But it used also to be widely believed that effective reward, at least in the early stages, had to be directly related to such basic physiological (生理的) “drives” as thirst or hunger. In other words, a baby would learn if he got food or drink of some sort of physical comfort, not otherwise.
It is now clear that this is not so. Babies will learn to behave in ways that produce results in the world with no reward except the successful outcome.
Papousek began his studies by using milk in the normal way to “reward” the babies and so teach them to carry out some simple movements, such as turning the head to one side or the other. Then he noticed that a baby who had had enough to drink would refuse the milk but would still go on making the learned response with clear signs of pleasure. So he began to study the children’s responses in situations where on milk was provided. He quickly found that children as young as four months would learn to turn their heads to right or left if the movement “switched on”. A display of lights-and indeed that they were capable of learning quite complex turns to bring about this result, for instance, two left or two right, or even to make as many three turns to one side.
Papousek’s light display was placed directly in front of the babies and he made the interesting observation that sometimes they would not turn back to watch the lights closely although they would “smile and bubble” when the display came on. Papousek concluded that it was not primarily the sight of the lights which pleased them, it was the success they were achieving in solving the problem, in mastering the skill, and that there exists a fundamental human urge to make sense of the world and bring it under intentional control.
96. According to the author, babies learn to do things which _____.
A) are directly related to pleasure
B) will meet their physical needs
C) will bring them a feeling of success
D) will satisfy their curiosity
97. Papousek noticed in his studies that a baby _____.
A) would make learned responses when it saw the milk
B) would carry out learned movements when it had enough to drink
C) would continue the simple movements without being given milk
D) would turn its head to right or left when it had enough to drink
98. In Papousek’s experiment babies make learned movements of the head in order to ______.
A) have the lights turned on
B) be rewarded with milk
C) please their parents
D) be praised
99. The babies would “smile and bubble” at the lights because ______.
A) the lights were directly related to some basic “drives”
B) the sight of the lights was interesting
C) they need not turn back to watch the lights
D) they succeeded in “switching on” the lights
100. According to Papousek, the pleasure babies get in achieving something is a reflection of _____.
A) a basic human desire to understand and control the world
B) the satisfaction of certain physiological needs
C) their strong desire to solve complex
D) a fundamental human urge to display their learned skills
21.
Mark felt that it was time for him to take part in his community, so he went to the neighborhood meeting after work.. The area's city councilwoman (女议员) was leading a discussion about how the quality of life was decreasing . The neighborhood faced many problems. Mark looked at the charts taped to the walls. There are charts for parking problems, crime, and for problems in vacant buildings . People were supposed to suggest solutions to the councilwoman.. It was too much for Mark. " The problems are too big ," he thought . He turned to the man next to him and said, "I think this is a waste of my time . Nothing I could do would make a difference here." Mark thought some more on his way to the bus stop. "People should just take care of themselves , " he decided. "That's enough to do . I can't take on all the problems of the world." As he neared the bus stop, Mark saw a woman carrying a grocery bag and baby. She was trying to unlock her car, but she didn't have a free hand . As Mark got closer, her other child , a littlle boy , suddenly darted into the street. The woman tried to reach for him, but as she moved, her bag shifted and groceries started to fall out . Mark ran to take the boy's arm and led him back to his mother. Then he picked up the groceries while the woman smiled in relief. "Thanks!" she said . " You've got great timing!" " Just being neighborly," Mark said . As he rode home, he glanced at the walls of the bus. On one of them was " Small acts of kindness add up ." Mark smiled and thought, " Maybe that's a good place to start." 101. It is known from the passage that _________. A) Mark played an active part in community activities B) the city councilwoman was responsible for the falling of life quality C) visual aids were used to display the seriousness of problems D) many people were discouraged by the many problems facing them 102.In Mark's opinion , ___________. A) nobody was so able as to solve the problems B) he was not in the position to solve such problems C) many people were too selfish to think about others D) he already had more than enough work to do 103. The word "darted" in paragraph 5 can be best replaced by _________. A) " walked " B) " marched " C) "wandered " D) " dashed " 104 What is the implication of the words on the bus wall? A) You should be kind to your neighbors and they will treat you the same way. B) Everyone can play his own part to make things better. C) All small acts will add up to kindness. D) It's a small act to help a person in need. 105. The passage is mainly about ____________. A) how individuals can help make a difference B) running a neighborhood meeting to solve its problems C) citizens' reactions to the problems they face D) solving problems through group action
22.
Lord Woolf, the most senior judge in Britain believes that the civil courts are a nightmare for those trapped in their procedures. The average High Court case takes more than three years from the legal document to trial. Many personal injury cases take twice as long. The costs of these legal cases are out of proportion to the stakes. Lawyer’s fees in personal injury cases amount to more than half the claim. Some multinational (跨国的) companies complain that the British court system is slower and more expensive than any other.
The new Lord Chief Justice, Lord Bingham, describes the excessive costs of civil litigation (诉讼) as a cancer eating at the heart of the administration of justice. His point is that when justice is expensive, most people do not have access to it. These days, only the very rich or the very poor (whose costs will be paid by the state) can afford to go to court. Rising costs, therefore, also means a growing burden on the taxpayer: public expenditure on civil legal aid has increased a lot since 1983.
Cases have allowed running on and on because, at present, the lawyers set the pace, and they have no interest in seeing a quick result. Lord Woolf’s remedy is to shift control of litigation (诉讼)from lawyers to judges.
Quicker, cheaper justice is in almost everybody’s interests; but there will be opposition from two sources. The Treasury (财政部)is worried that, even though the court costs per case should fail, the costs to the state of the system as a whole will probably rise: there will have to be more judges, more staff members in the court, and the court system will need to be computerized. But such objections can be easily met. Higher court costs could be passed onto the litigants who would still pay less overall because their lawyer bills would be so much smaller.
Opposition may also come from lawyers. Some of them will complain that handing power to the courts will restrict their ability to represent their client’s interests. If justice is cheaper, it will also be rougher. Such an outcome is possible, but it is far from inevitable. In any case, the finest legal system in the world would still not provide justice if most people do not have access to it.
106. Lord Woolf describes the British court system as a nightmare because _________.
A) many people are trapped in its procedures
B) it takes at least 3 years before any court decision is made
C) it is expensive and inefficient
D) it is irresponsible and indifferent
107. As a result of the high costs of civil litigation, _____________.
A) the poor are actually not protected by law
B) few people in Britain go to court
C) justice is hardly existent in Britain
D) most people can not afford to go to court
108. In order to avoid the delay of cases, Lord Woolf suggests that _________.
A) lawyer’ s fees be reduced
B) judges take over the control of litigation
C) lawyers no longer set the pace
D) the court prescribes a time limit for each case
109. Lord Woolf’s remedy is opposed to by lawyers because ___________.
A) the cheaper a thing is, the poorer the quality will be
B) the court will restrict their ability to represent their client’ s interests
C) the costs to the state of the system as a whole will probably rise
D) the lack of money and time will result in a decline in the quality of their work
110. Which of the following is closest in meaning to the last sentence of the passage?
A) In dealing with any legal cases, the finest legal system is not necessarily the most efficient if people do not have faith in it.
B) It is not always the case that the best legal system is still able to provide justice even if most people do not have access to it.
C) Whatever happens, the finest legal system in the world will not do people justice if people do not go to court.
D) No matter how good a legal system is, it would not be able to perform its duty if people are denied access to it.
23.
A number of recent books have reworked subjects, forms and writing techniques. Today's children read stories about divorce, death, drugs, air pollution, political extremism and violence. Relying on the magic of the illustrator, all kinds of books are being published. Before they know to read, babies can play with books made of cloth or books made to take in the bath. Later on, they are given picture books that may be cubical(立方形)or triangular, outsized or very small. They also like work-books which come with watercolors and paintbrushes, and comic books(漫画册)filled with details where they have to spot a figure hidden among thousands of others. Not that the traditional children's books are being neglected. There are still storybooks where the pages pop up(跳起)when they are opened, to make a forest or a castle. Among the latest ideas are interactive stories where readers choose the plot(情节)or ending they want, and books on CD, which are very popular in rich industrialized countries. The public has enthusiastically greeted the wealth of creativity displayed by publishers. "Previously, giving a child a book as often seen as improper," says Canadian author Marie-France Hebért. Her books, published by a French-language publisher, sell like hot cakes in hundreds of thousands of copies. "There's a real appetite for reading these days and I try to get across to children the passion for reading which is food for the mind and the heart, like a medicine or a vitamin." 111."Reworked" as used in Paragraph 1 means "___________________". A) reworded B) rewritten C) processed D) revised 112.In the second paragraph the author lists the kinds of books ___________________. A) recently published B) of various shapes C) babies like D) popular among children 113.Which of the following statements is true? A) Books made of cloth came out earlier than picture books. B) When you buy work-books you will be given free comic books. C) Traditional children's books are not being removed from market. D) Babies cannot have books while taking a bath. 114. The expression "get across to children" in the last paragraph probably means "___________________". A) pass on to children B) make children believe C) teach children D) get around to children 115.The main idea of the last paragraph is that people have ___________________. A) warmly welcomed the abundance of wealth shown by publishers B) warmly welcomed the enormous amount of creativity shown by publishers C) showed great enthusiasm in publishers of treat wealth D) reacted strongly to the unlimited creativity of publishers
24.
Space is a dangerous place, not only because of meteors(流星) but also because of rays from the sun and other stars. The atmosphere again acts as our protective blanket on earth. Light gets through, and this is essential for plants to make the food which we eat. Heat, too, makes our environment endurable. Various kinds of rays come through the air from outer space, but enormous quantities of radiation from the sun are screened off. As soon as men leave the atmosphere, they are exposed to this radiation but their spacesuits or the walls of their spacecraft, if they are inside, do prevent a lot of radiation damage.
Radiation is the greatest known danger to explorers in space. The unit of radiation is called “rem”. Scientists have reason to think that a man can put up with far more radiation than 0.1 rem without being damaged; the figure of 60 rems has been agreed on. The trouble is that it is extremely difficult to be sure about radiation damage-a person may feel perfectly well, but the cells of his or her sex organs may be damage, and this will not be discovered until the birth of deformed children or even grandchildren. Missions of the Apollo flights have had to cross belts of high radiation, and during the outward and return journeys, the Apollo crew accumulated a large amount of rems. So far, no dangerous amounts of radiation have been reported, but the Apollo missions have been quite short. We simply do not know yet how men are going to get on when they spend weeks and months outside the protection of the atmosphere, working in a space laboratory. Drugs might help to decrease the damage done by radiation, but no really effective ones have been found so far.
116. According to the first paragraph, the atmosphere is essential to man in that ________________.
A) it protects him against the harmful rays from space
B) it provides sufficient light for plant growth
C) it supplies the heat necessary for human survival
D) it screens off the falling meteors
117. We know from the passage that _________________.
A) exposure to even tiny amounts of radiation is fatal
B) the effect of exposure to radiation is slow in coming
C) radiation is avoidable in space exploration
D) astronauts in spacesuits needn’t worry about radiation damage
118. The harm radiation has done to the Apollo crew members ______________.
A) is insignificant B) seems overestimated
C) is enormous D) remains unknown
119. It can be inferred from the passage that _________________.
A) the Apollo mission was very successful
B) protection from space radiation is no easy job
C) astronauts will have deformed children or grandchildren
D) radiation is not a threat to well-protected space explorers
120. The best title for this passage would be ___________________.
A) The Atmosphere and Our Environment
B) Research on Radiation
C) Effects of Space Radiation
D) Importance of Protection against Radiation
三、完形填空
1.
How often one hears children wishing they were grown up, and old people wishing they were young again. Each 1__, however, has its pleasures and _2__ pains, and the happiest person is the _3__ who enjoys what each age gives him _4__ wasting his time in useless _5_. Childhood is a time when there are few responsibilities to make _6__ difficult. A child is usually fed, looked after and loved, _7_ he may do. It is _8_ that he will ever again in his life be given so _9__ without having to do anything in _10_. In addition, life is always presenting new things to the child.
Old age, on the other hand, has always been _11__ of as the worst age to be; but with old age _12__ come wisdom and the ability to help others _13__ advice (wisely given). The old can have the 14__ of seeing their sons and daughters _15__ making progress in life; they can _16__ their grandchildren growing up around them; and perhaps _17_ of all, they can feel the happiness of having reached a _18__ when they can lie back and rest, _19__ others to continue the battle _20__ life.
1. A) time B) person C) age D) division
2. A) many B) its C) their D) also
3. A) one B) luckiest C) child D) best
4. A) unless B) without C) except D) beyond
5. A) work B) efforts C) attempts D) regrets
6. A) people B) child C) them D) life
7. A) however B) which C) whatever D) what
8. A) impossible B) unreasonable C) surely D) natural
9. A) few B) many C) little D) much
10.A) fact B) return C) kindness D) thought
11.A) considered B) thought C) concerned D) regarded
12.A) should B) must C) need D) can
13.A) by B) for C) in D) with
14.A) joy B) profit C) advantage D) benefit
15.A) exceedingly B) gradually C) thoroughly D) increasingly
16.A) watch B) make C) bring D) control
17.A) one B) any C) worst D) best
18A) level B) decision C) point D) time
19.A) helping B) leaving C) inviting D) forcing
20.A) on B) of C) about D) over
2.
There was a time then parents who wanted an educational present for their children would buy a typewriter, a globe or a set of encyclopedia(百科全书). Now those _1__ seem hopelessly old-fashioned: this Christmas, _2__ a lot of personal computers under the tree. _3__ that computers are their key to success, parents are also frantically insisting that children _4_ taught to use them in school--- as early as possible.
The problem for schools is that when it _5__ computers, parents do not always know best. Many schools are __6_ parental impatience and are purchasing hardware _7__ sound educational planning so they can say, :Ok, we’ve moved into the computer age.” Teachers _8__ themselves caught in the middle of the problem-between parent pressure and _9__ educational decisions. Educators do not even agree _10__ how computers should be used. A lot of money is going for computerized educational materials _11__ research has shown can be taught _12__ with pencil and paper. Even those who believe that all children should _13__ to computer warn of potential __14_ to the very young.
The temptation remains strong largely because young children _15__ so well to computers. First graders have been __16_ willing to work for two hours on math skills. Some have an attention span of 20 minutes. _17__ school can afford to go into computing, and that creates _18__ another problem: division between the haves and have-nots.
Very few parents _19__ for computer instruction in poor school districts, _20__ there may be barely enough money to pay the reading teacher.
1. A) items B) books C) sets D) series
2. A) there were B) they were C) there had D) they had
3. A) Given B) Provided C) Convinced D) Believed
4. A) are B) be C) are being D) were
5. A) talks about B) comes to C) turns to D) mentions
6. A) ignorant of B) blaming C) yielding to D) absent from
7. A) without B) with C) through D) for
8. A) relied on B) relaxed C) freed D) found
9. A) wise B) clever C) slow D) enough
10.A) on B) with C) to D) about
11.A) however B) where C) what D) that
12.A) equally B) in the same way C) just as well D) not as well
13.A) be open B) have access C) look D) turn
14.A) approaches B) exposures C) hazards D) laziness
15.A) adopt B) keep C) adapt D) devote
16.A) watched B) seen C) told D) taught
17.A) So many B) Not every C) No D) Any
18.A) already B) of course C) in addition D) yet
19.A) demand B) expect C) press D) require
20.A) due that B) in any case C) although D) where
3.
One summer night, on my way home from work I decided to see a movie. I knew the theatre would be air-conditioned and I couldn’t face my __1_ apartment.
Sitting in the theatre I had to look through the _2_ between the two tall heads in front of me. I had to keep changing the __3_ every time she leaned over to talk to him, __4_ he leaned over to kiss her. Why do Americans display such __5 in a public place?
I thought the movie would be good for my English, but 6__ it turned out, it was an Italian movie. _7__ about an hour I decided to give up on the movie and __8_ on my popcorn (爆玉米花). I’ve never understood why they give you so much popcorn! It tasted pretty good, __9_. After a while I heard _10__ more of the romantic-sounding Italians. I just heard the __11_ of the popcorn crunching (咀嚼) between my teeth. My thought started to _12_. I remembered when I was in South Korea (韩国), I _13__ to watch Kojak on TV frequently. He spoke perfect Korean--- I was really amazed. He seemed like a good friend to me, _14__ I saw him again in New York speaking __15_ English instead of perfect Korean. He didn’t even have a Koran accent and I _16__ like I had been betrayed.
When our family moved to the United States six years ago, none of us spoke any English. _17__ we had begun to learn a few words, my mother suggested that we all should speak English at home. Everyone agreed, but our house became very _18__ and we all seemed to avoid each other. We sat at the dinner table in silence, preferring that to __19__ in a difficult language. Mother tried to say something in English but it __20_ out all wrong and we all burst into laughter and decided to forget it! We’ve been speaking Korean at home ever since.
1 A) warm B) hot C) heated D) cool
2. A) crack B) blank C) break D) opening
3. A) aspect B) view C) space D) angle
4. A) while B) whenever C) or D) and
5. A) attraction B) attention C) affection D) motion
6. A) since B) when C) what D) as
7. A) Within B) After C) For D) Over
8. A) concentrate B) chew C) fix D) taste
9. A) too B) still C) though D) certainly
10. A) much B) any C) no D) few
11. A) voice B) sound C) rhythm D) tone
12. A) wonder B) wander C) imagine D) depart
13. A) enjoyed B) happened C) turned D) used
14. A) until B) because C) then D) therefore
15. A) artificial B) informal C) perfect D) practical
16. A) felt B) looked C) seemed D) appeared
17. A) While B) If C) Before D) Once
18 A) empty B) quiet C) stiff D) calm
19. A) telling B) uttering C) saying D) speaking
20. A) worked B) got C) came D) made
4.
From the __1__ “Lord Williams” clearly had a great amount of __2_. A few villagers were __3_ of him but most saw nothing that __4_ doubts until later. All agreed that he _5__ a great amount of money _6__ the village. His money was used to _7__ many properties. Many people thought him charming and __8_ and did not suspect he was _9__ them. Where did this money _10__ from? He told _11__ that he had _12__ the money from a rich uncle. Certainly he was happy _13__ nearly 5 million pounds into the village. This was a _14__ village with a _15__ view which _16__ over the _17__. He was satisfied to _18__ money into this village with its _19__ views. This was his _20__ village.
1. A) begin B) beginner C) beginning D) began
2. A) wealthy B) wealth C) healthy D) health
3. A) suspicious B) suspicion C) doubtable D) doubted
4. A) arose B) aroused C) arise D) arouse
5. A) injected B) objected C) rejected D) projected
6. A) on B) into C) at D) to
7. A) erect B) store C) restore D) resource
8. A) considerate B) considerable C) considering D) considered
9. A) leading B) misleading C) unleading D) disleading
10.A) get B) take C) come D) go
11.A) none B) anyone C) someone D) everyone
12.A) borrowed B) loaned C) heritage D) inherited
13.A) digging B) dropping C) pouring D) running
14.A) wealthy B) colorful C) beautiful D) dutiful
15.A) fantastic B) statistic C) artistic D) critical
16.A) disappears B) disappearing C) reach D) appear
17.A) horizon B) horizontal C) horizons D) horizontals
18.A) sink B) sunk C) sank D) sunken
19.A) twisting B) rolling C) straightening D) striding
20.A) various B) anxious C) glorious D) courageouswww.ap5u.com提醒:答案可以联系Q或微信 761296021
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发表于 2019-7-24 09:16:55 | 显示全部楼层
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